Select Page

Media Code

Google, Nine agree commercial terms for news content 

  • Another day, another deal with Google. Nine reportedly struck a $30 million-a-year cash deal with Google on Wednesday. (although neither side are officially confirming it yet)
  • The AFR is reporting Junkee Media inked a smaller agreement and Guardian Australia and the ABC could have agreements wrapped up by the end of the week. That follows the Seven West deal we spoke about earlier in the week. 
  • Under the proposed Media code the options are basically: negotiate or arbitrate 
  • This could be Google setting the market rate before it goes into arbitration. Ie News can’t ask for $600 million when Nine’s already agreed to $30 million 
  • Nothing from FB yet. I wonder how those negotiations are going. 
  • What would you do with the cash? Well, the media union, the MEAA, says any money from these content deals must “end up in the newsroom, not the boardroom” 

Facebook Ban 

https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/craig-kelly-cops-one-week-facebook-ban-for-covid-19-misinformation-20210216-p5730u.html?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1613459499

  • Federal member for Hughes, Craig Kelly, has copped a 7 day ban from Facebook for “violating the company’s COVID 19 misinformation policy
  • Facebook also deleted four coronavirus-related posts from Mr Kelly’s official MP Facebook page, including one where he likened the wearing of masks by children to child abuse.
  • Mr Kelly has used his page, which has more than 80,000 followers, to promote treatments for COVID-19 at odds with official government and medical advice.
  • Kelly revealed the 7 day ban in a bizarre interview with Cam Wilson of Gizmodo
  • At one point in the interview, Kelly is asked what fact checking he does before sharing Covid related stuff and gave this answer: 
  • Before I posted it, I checked the credibility of it. He had this long Jewish beard. He looked a bit … I looked him up to see that he was on the up and up and I satisfied myself. So I posted it to Facebook.

Amazon just bought an Australian ecommerce company you’ve never heard of

  • Imagine you’re an Aussies entrepreneur, you started your business in 2013 making ecommerce software. Over the years you raise $11 million, and open offices overseas. 
  • Then you do the biggest deal of your life and sell your company to Amazon. What do you do? 
  • Selz, which was founded in Sydney, announced they had been bought by Amazon in January with 2 sentences of their website. And no one really noticed until this week. 
  • “We have signed an agreement to be acquired by Amazon and are looking forward to working with them as we continue to build easy-to-use tools for entrepreneurs.” CEO Martin Rushe 
  • There’s a few reasons Amazon might have wanted to do this deal, one would be as an acqui-hire (an acquisition primarily aimed at hiring Selz’s leadership team). 
  • Or it could the start of a Shopify v Amazon rivalry. So Amazon and Shopify don’t really compete at the moment, because Amazon is a marketplace where I can go sell things and Shopify lets me build an online store and process payments. 
  • Selz is a tiny version of Shopify, 
  • Amazon has had a crack at this before with something called Amazon Webstore, but that was shutdown in 2015 

Twitter Concern

https://www.itnews.com.au/news/twitter-worried-by-secret-account-takeover-data-access-powers-561127?eid=1&edate=20210217&utm_source=20210217_AM&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_campaign=daily_newsletter

  • Twitter has criticised proposed laws that would allow the Australian Federal Police to collect data from user accounts without letting the user know
  • The proposal is part of the Surveillance Legislation Amendment (Identity and Disrupt) Bill – which was briefly introduced then shelved in the final week of parliament in 2020
  • “We believe it will take sustained research, discussion and effort from government, industry and relevant expert civil society to appropriately reform this draft legislation and its relevant processes,” the microblogging service said
  • “We are very concerned about the implications for Twitter’s own obligations as a company, as well as the rights and privacy implications for the users of Twitter and other online services,” it said.
  • “Also, it does not appear that the bill has contemplated any processes to consider and protect the rights of any third-party users who may interact with the account… subject to a [warrant].
  • Twitter asks if it is supposed to be handing over the keys to accounts if the law passes, noting it is not “technically feasible” for it to do so, as it does not store passwords in plaintext. 

Not really tech but interesting: Circular economy: Coles using recycled bags to build new Melbourne supermarket 

Maybe 

https://www.itnews.com.au/news/telstra-stands-up-automated-platform-to-block-scam-calls-561106